Kids in Museums published its Mini Manifesto at its carnival at Tate Moderns’ new Switch House today after listening to families and museums, who said they wanted a Mini Manifesto to work with alongside the 20-point Kids in Museums Manifesto. The charity, which organises Takeover Day and the Family Friendly Museums Award, said that small changes can have big impact and the Mini Manifesto will empower museums to make them, so families and children can benefit.

“From Say ‘Hello!’ to never say ‘No’, from child-height stair rails to Tell your story and include their stories too, the Kids in Museums Mini Manifesto is a simple, easy to understand guide to what families and children want and need on a visit,” it said.

The Mini Manifesto:

  1. Reach out. Begin the welcome beyond your door. Help families find you, go out to meet them, start friendly conversations on their home patch and make your museum easy to reach.
  1. Get to know your families. Some have babies, some toddlers, teenagers, parents, grandparents or foster children. Embrace these differences, from your programme to your ticketing.
  1. Seek to reflect your community and include it at your heart in your displays, interpretation and events.
  1. Be positive. Say ‘Hello!’ Welcome enthusiastic comments (which may be loud), have things to touch and explore, challenge your staff to never say ‘No’
  1. Make it easy and Comfortable — with a family friendly café, pushchair friendly toilets, seating in the galleries, a place to store skateboards and teenage kit, child-height stair rails, tap water. Just a few of the very practical ways to help a family relax and have fun.
  1. Be accessible. Families with disabilities may make an extra effort to reach you. Include their needs in everything you do and say — from how to get there to exploring the displays. All your visitors should be equally supported and welcomed.
  1. Tell your story. Families aren’t only coming to see your collections. They’re coming to enjoy your museum and hear your stories. These are what they’ll share when they get home. Find a way to include their stories too. They’ll add new insights and make the museum belong to them.
  1. Communicate well. Let families know what you offer. Include this on your website and social media. Chat with families before they visit and after they leave. Build relationships and include them in long-term decision-making. These families will become your greatest advocates.

More than 800 museums, heritage sites and visitor attractions are signed up in support of the Kids in Museums Manifesto. Find out who and join them at by clicking here.

Kids in Museums is dedicated to making museums accessible to all children and families, in particular those who haven’t visited before.

Chartered Institute of Fundraising October 2021
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